Creative Practice – Post 6

“WHERE IS THE BURNING?” – It’s coming soon, but in the meantime here’s what I’ve been reading, watching looking at etc.

Hollis Frampton – Nostalgia (1971)

A film in which Frampton burns photographs, while a narration provides a description for the upcoming photograph simultaneously.

 

For a bit more context, I’ve also been reading the following about Frampton’s work. They have been insightful, not only with understanding the nature of destruction within art and burning the photographs, but also the disjunction created by the narrative with the audio and visual components portraying a different narrative.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/32555396/Segal_UT_publication.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A&Expires=1502538685&Signature=PitrkrsUD2c2xfuoIJ95sWJfJHw%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DFrom_the_Private_to_the_Public_Photograp.pdf

http://www.jstor.org/stable/20687561?seq=3#page_scan_tab_contents

https://books.google.co.uk/books?hl=en&lr=&id=7oaop4ekuEMC&oi=fnd&pg=PR6&dq=hollis+frampton+nostalgia&ots=dtwSu01AMo&sig=JARDS0m5JN5xAGHE797FWRYXPGM#v=onepage&q=hollis%20frampton%20nostalgia&f=false

Auto-destructive art and Gustav Metzger

I have also been reading articles and viewing artworks that would fall under the category of Auto-destructive art, taking inspiration from the pioneering artist in the movement Gustav Metzger in particular.

Of all the work I viewed, one in particular, in conjunction with the line of one quote, had an impact on my outlook towards this project more than any other did.

“The important thing about burning a hole in that sheet was that it opened up a new view across the Thames of St Paul’s cathedral. Auto-destructive art was never merely destructive. Destroy a canvas and you create shapes.”

Recreation of First Public Demonstration of Auto-Destructive Art 1960, remade 2004, 2015 Gustav Metzger

An integral part to my work is the view, and challenging perceptions of how domestic photographs are viewed. I have taken a large amount of inspiration from how Metzger perceived the destruction of the sheet altered how a view was observed. It has encouraged me to experiment with using a sheet to cover my photographs, and in turn destroy the sheet as a metaphor for breaking down the concealment within domestic photography and the family album, and also as an expression of looking at the images with an alternative view.

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