HSS8123 – An Index of Plagiarisms

Now that the pamphlets for my final project are mostly done, here’s an attempt at to list all the different sources and techniques I used in creating them:

SOURCES:
Summary Judgement
The Big Bang Theory (TV show)
Soft Kitty – Edith Newlin (song)
“Let’s Go Crazy” #1 – Stephanie Lenz (video)
Let’s Go Crazy – Prince (song)
Photograph – Ed Sheeran (song)
Amazing – Matt Cardle (song)
Ice Ice Baby – Vanilla Ice (song)
Under Pressure – Queen (song)
Chocolat – Mi Casa (song)
Chocolate – DJ Novi (song)
Blurred Lines – Robin Thicke (song)
Got to Give It Up (Marvin Gaye)
Melissa Ferrick (musician)
Spotify (music website)
Napster (file-sharing website)

Beautiful Infighting
Catcall – Rob Bliss (film)
Shoshana Roberts (actress)
Starr Mazer DSB – Imagos Softworks (game)
Alex Mauer (musician)
Cool Cat Saves the Kids – Derek Savage (film)
Review of Cool Cat Saves the Kids – I Hate Everything (video)
Review of Cool Cat Saves the Kids – Your Movie Sucks (video)
Bold Guy vs Parkour Girl – Matthew Hosseinzadeh (video)
Parody of Bold Guy vs Parkour Girl – h3h3 (video)
The Slaughtering Grounds – Digital Homicide (game)
Review of the Slaughtering Grounds – Jim Sterling (video)

Changelogs
Pokemon Red & Blue Version – Nintendo (game)
Pokemon Silver & Gold Version – Nintendo (game)
Cooking Mama – Nintendo (game)
Super Mario Bros. – Nintendo (game)
Pokemon Uranium Version – InvoluntaryTwitch (game)
Pokemon Black and Blue Version – PETA (game)
Pokemon Red White and Blue Version – PETA (game)
Cooking Mama: Mama Kills Animals – PETA (game)
Mario Kills Tanooki – PETA (game)
Super Meat Boy – Team Meat (game)
Super Tofu Boy – PETA (game)
Bioshock – 2K Games (game)
Fallout – Bethesda (game)
Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest – Konami (game)
CR Pachinko Akumajo Dracula – Konami (pachinko machine)
Donald Trump’s Real Estate Tycoon – Activision Value (game)
Supreme Ruler: Trump Rising – Battlegoat Studios (game)
Super POTUS Trump – Emerson Design Inc (game)
An Index of Plagiarisms in Lanark – Alasdair Grey (prose)

Oulipean Pataphysical Plagiarising Nonsense
The Road Not Taken – Robert Frost (poem)
A Red, Red Rose – Robert Burns (poem)
Funeral Blues – W.H. Auden (poem)
I Found the Quine – Jackie Kay (poem)
Sonnet 18 – Shakespeare (poem)
Daddy – Sylvia Plath (poem)
Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night – Dylan Thomas (poem)
This Be The Verse – Philip Larkin (poem)
Mother Any Distance – Simon Armitage (poem)
Green Eggs and Ham – Dr Seuss (poem)
The Tay Bridge Diasaster – William McGonagall (poem)
To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvell (poem)
The Lovesong of J.Alfred Prufrock – T.S. Eliot (poem)
Sonnet 43 – Elizabeth Barrett Browning (poem)
The Lady of Shalott – Alfred Lord Tennyson (poem)
Dulche Et Decorum Est – Wilfred Owen (poem)
The Jabberwocky – C.S. Lewis (poem)
The Waste Land – T.S. Eliot (poem)
Tyger Tyger – William Blake (poem)
Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats – T.S. Eliot (poem)
Halfway Down the Stairs – A.A. Milne (poem)
The Lord of the Rings trilogy – JRR Tolkein (prose)
Dungeons and Dragons – Wizards of the Coast (roleplaying game)
The Golden Shovel – Terrance Hayes (poem)
We Real Cool – Gwendolyn Brooks (poem)
The Workshop of Pataphysical Semantics – Hubert Kowalowski (review)
20 Things I’ve Stolen – David Weinberger (poem)
The Church of Scientology – L. Ron Hubbard (cult)

METHODS (Oulipean and otherwise)
Summary Judgement
Chronograms – derived from the year the lawsuit in question was filed

Beautiful Infighting
Beautiful Inlaw/Beau Presente – derived from the names of the litigious parties involved

Changelogs
Centos – derived by taking lines from various sources and recombining them
Definitional Literature – derived by substituting each word with in the text its dictionary definition
Redaction – derived by blacking out certain parts of the original text
Acrostic/Mesostic/Telostic – poems where the first/middle/last letters spell out a particular word or phrase (often used in combination)
‘Titling’ – taking the title (and first line) of the work from another work
Abecedarian – in which each word begins with the next letter of the alphabet (here combined with an acrostic)

Oulipean Pataphysical Plagiarising Nonsense
Centos – derived by taking lines from various sources and recombining them
Redaction – derived by blacking out certain parts of the original text
‘Find-and-replace’ – derived by replacing the proper nouns of a work with the proper nouns of another work
N+7 – derived by replacing each noun in the text with the next noun in the Dictionary but seven
Golden Shovel – derived by taking each word from the source poem as the final word of each line
Pataphor – derived by replacing non-figurative language with metaphor, then replacing each metaphor with pataphor (i.e. extrapolating it to a new, more literal sense)

HSS8123; Filming

*Finally got around to posting this now that the blog is back up and I’m not as swamped with the project itself.

Filming has finally been done. Given only a week in the sound studio to do what I needed, every hour counted, and it virtually became my home for that time.

The completed first set, and final models in place while filming the first “act.”

The second set, featuring the two characters Enki and Ada, as well as the scrapyard of all the failed test subjects, both in real life and in-universe.

Final set up for the second stage.

For the most part, though hectic and a little tedious at times, filming went rather smoothly. Another friend, an actual photographer, came in early during my week time limit and showed me some pointers on using the equipment I had on loan. As it turned out, my lighting was not idea, and this meant I needed to reshoot the first three scenes as their lighting quality was both bad and inconsistent with the rest of the film. Though some corners were skipped, and some scenes could have perhaps used more frames, I am at least content in knowing that I have plenty of material to actually make the film itself.

HSS8123; The Dog

*Finally got around to posting this now that the blog is back up and I’m not as swamped with the project itself.

My little clay man in his chair, Enki, is only one of two characters integral to the film I’m trying to make. The deuteragonist of the piece is Ada, the cybernetic dog created by Enki as a companion. If I thought the chair was bad, the damn dog was an even lower circle of hell, however. Unlike the chair, which only needed to have moving wheels, Ada requires more flexible movement akin to clay. He needed to be able to move his head, wag his tail, maybe even have movable legs if I was feeling especially ambitious (which, in the end, I wasn’t due to continued time constraints).

I mentioned the issue of scale in the previous post, and with Ada the dog it reared its ugly head again. In order to facilitate head movement, the plan was to incorporate a ball and socket joint into the dog’s model, allowing a fairly free range of movement in a number of directions. Obviously, this joint would have to be fairly small in comparison to the rest of the body, otherwise the proportions would be atrocious, or I’d have to scale the whole thing up to a ridiculous extent. This proved problematic for the printer, and it took many long hours of tinkering and tweaking to finally get a model it could print without horrible deformities.

The many failures of 3D printing, including some of the dog models.

An eventual success. By fixing the ball to the body, and using the joint as a face, it became much easier for the printer to process. The tail I found an elegant solution in a bit of twisted wire hooked around a small stub with a hole in it.

Next was giving the dog some texture or fur that still retained a metallic/cyber feel. This thread was one avenue, but didn’t quite work.

Another attempt at fur. A little too boisterous, and messy, however.

The idea to include fur on the dog was both a visual and technical one. Mostly it meant I wouldn’t need to include legs if the fur was thick enough, easing animation and allowing it to simply float along. As happy as I was with it, I simply couldn’t find anything with the right texture or size to properly act as fur, and so the idea was eventually scrapped.

HSS8123; More Models

*Finally got around to posting this now that the blog is back up and I’m not as swamped with the project itself.

It has been a grind, sometimes literally, but finally starting to get the models in place. Though I’ll likely only be using one, I’ve luckily been able to get some very basic clay sculpting lessons from a friend and have made a few extra tests to get a good feel for size, flexibility, and durability. many of these models are too small to properly use an armature, a vital part of the process. Indeed, many of the hurdles of this project have so far revolved around scale.

If there is one thing I am quite unhappy about with this final model is a lack of hubcaps on the wheels of the chair. I tried glue, a cleaner option, but the material used in the printing process is not very conductive to adhesion, and thus I’ve been forced to use clay as a means of keeping the wheels from falling off. Even that isn’t perfect, and they often have to be adjusted after a little rolling. They are, however, functional, which at this point I will happily take.

HSS8123; More Models

*Finally got around to posting this now that the blog is back up and I’m not as swamped with the project itself.

It has been a grind, sometimes literally, but finally starting to get the models in place. Though I’ll likely only be using one, I’ve luckily been able to get some very basic clay sculpting lessons from a friend and have made a few extra tests to get a good feel for size, flexibility, and durability. many of these models are too small to properly use an armature, a vital part of the process. Indeed, many of the hurdles of this project have so far revolved around scale.

If there is one thing I am quite unhappy about with this final model is a lack of hubcaps on the wheels of the chair. I tried glue, a cleaner option, but the material used in the printing process is not very conductive to adhesion, and thus I’ve been forced to use clay as a means of keeping the wheels from falling off. Even that isn’t perfect, and they often have to be adjusted after a little rolling. They are, however, functional, which at this point I will happily take.

HSS8123; Sets and Models

*Finally got around to posting this now that the blog is back up and I’m not as swamped with the project itself.

 

Having ideas is one thing, making them physical is entirely another. Although I am happy with the ideas I’m currently running with, they have presented many of their own time consuming issues which need to be overcome. On a more positive note, over the past few weeks I’ve at the very least been able to gather most of the materials I’ll need for a set and been able to stitch plans together now knowing how much space I have to work with. The primary idea is to have two sets, one in white to represent the sterile environment of a laboratory while the other is to be of the outside, in a desert and scrapyard to be precise.

Playing around with arts and crafts to see what works.

Prop and environment making. Here we have a computer made from an old alarm clock. The surgery table is made from the back of the same clock, while the arms are wires, floss brushes, and coloured beads.

However, though set building may be going well, model making is not. In the previous post I talked about the prospect of making my main character wheelchair bound, alleviating many of the technical necessities normally part of making stop-motion. However, 3D printing such a chair has been proving to be a headache too; the printer does not work well with small parts, and any item needs to be of a certain scale for a successful print to take place. Getting the chair and accompanying axle and wheels to a size that isn’t too big for my sets or props, but which could also be printed to a decent standard so as to still fit together is proving to be very demanding. Given the speed of printing, this also means many hours are going down the drain.

Early model for a chair. At first glance this may seem perfectly functional, but getting axles and wheels to go with it at such a small scale is proving impossible.

A larger model. Better on scale, but an error near the end of printing meant the chair was not finished.

As exciting a technology as 3D printing is, it’s still very much taking its baby steps, at least as far as our printer is concerned. Beyond the often excruciating time needed to print anything, trying to print anything smaller than an inch is prone to failure. Sometimes this applies even to items on larger scales – the printer is prone to jamming and other errors, and when one such failure occurs the entire print needs to be started again. After, of course, a lengthy repair period.

HSS8123; Sets and Models

*Finally got around to posting this now that the blog is back up and I’m not as swamped with the project itself.

 

Having ideas is one thing, making them physical is entirely another. Although I am happy with the ideas I’m currently running with, they have presented many of their own time consuming issues which need to be overcome. On a more positive note, over the past few weeks I’ve at the very least been able to gather most of the materials I’ll need for a set and been able to stitch plans together now knowing how much space I have to work with. The primary idea is to have two sets, one in white to represent the sterile environment of a laboratory while the other is to be of the outside, in a desert and scrapyard to be precise.

Playing around with arts and crafts to see what works.

Prop and environment making. Here we have a computer made from an old alarm clock. The surgery table is made from the back of the same clock, while the arms are wires, floss brushes, and coloured beads.

However, though set building may be going well, model making is not. In the previous post I talked about the prospect of making my main character wheelchair bound, alleviating many of the technical necessities normally part of making stop-motion. However, 3D printing such a chair has been proving to be a headache too; the printer does not work well with small parts, and any item needs to be of a certain scale for a successful print to take place. Getting the chair and accompanying axle and wheels to a size that isn’t too big for my sets or props, but which could also be printed to a decent standard so as to still fit together is proving to be very demanding. Given the speed of printing, this also means many hours are going down the drain.

Early model for a chair. At first glance this may seem perfectly functional, but getting axles and wheels to go with it at such a small scale is proving impossible.

A larger model. Better on scale, but an error near the end of printing meant the chair was not finished.

As exciting a technology as 3D printing is, it’s still very much taking its baby steps, at least as far as our printer is concerned. Beyond the often excruciating time needed to print anything, trying to print anything smaller than an inch is prone to failure. Sometimes this applies even to items on larger scales – the printer is prone to jamming and other errors, and when one such failure occurs the entire print needs to be started again. After, of course, a lengthy repair period.

HSS8123 – Success!

Well, that didn’t take long. In fact, it took less than a minute for an unlisted video to get blocked, so either the ghost of Prince was standing right behind me when I uploaded it, or it YouTube’s algorithms are pretty good at policing video content. Good to know.

HSS8123 – …aaand we’re back!

Which is to say the course blog is back up and I’m back, with two weeks off from my new job to really knuckle down and make all the scattered ideas from the last few months into a coherent reality.

Here are the three posts that went up on my other blog while this one was down: one to introduce my degree project on my personal blog, two a poem about theft by David Weinburger (which I discovered while researching and really resonates with what I’m trying to do) and three excerpts from my final project.

And finally, some more teasers in the form of video/image collages that came about as a byproduct of the poems I’ve been writing:

More documentation and excerpts to follow, although I might find myself focusing more on the dissertation as opposed to writing the kinds of explanatory posts I normally do. We’ll see, I’d like to write something about the Oulipo and Lawrence Lessig, and maybe some of the bits and bobs of plagiarism that I don’t feel like I’ll be able to give enough context in the work itself.

 

 

Creative Project – Post 7

And so it begins.

I staged several experiments of how best  to burn and destroy the photographs. Having left the previous experiments for a matter of months, there was no change. My erasing was mostly a failure other than the bleach. Therefore bleach was carried forward to the next round of experiments (diluted bleach, as I learned from last time.)

In this round of experiments the following took place:

  • Glue on the back, bleach and burn the front
  • Wallpaper paste on the back and front (to distort)
  • Paste on back and front bleach and burn
  • Paste on back and front bleach
  • Paste on back and front burn

The following images depict the results:

 

I found that the best result was achieved by using paste on the back, and several layers on the front, followed by burning with the blow torch. The paste must be left for several days between layers and burning so that it is set.