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Rhythm and luminous performance

Klaus Obermaier & Ars Electronica Futurelab - Apparition

Klaus Obermaier & Ars Electronica Futurelab - Apparition

This exhibition spreads around with the theme rhythm and explains the connection between human movement and luminous performance by using interactive technology.

rAndom international & Philips Electronics’ Lumiblade – You fade to light, OLED Installation 2009

In this one, it consider as “the world’s first OLED media wall”, using next generation OLED technology, create an interface with thousands of OLEDs. On this interactive wall, it captured user’s movement and drew the outline of their figures. When user passing by or even dancing in front of this wall, it will trigger the on/off of the OLEDs. Luminous changed with the movement of user, create a digital rhythm luminous efficiency.

rAndom international & Philips Electronics’ Lumiblade – You fade to light, OLED Installation 2009

Siddharth Mankad, Aashka Shah and Sunil Vallu – Interactive Wall Installation 2009

This is another interactive wall designed by Siddharth Mankad, Aashka Shah and Sunil Vallu. It used a wide angle webcam to track users’ movement and wrote code in Processing 1.0. On this wall the rhythm was represented on “following” and “growing”. Random coloured circles or curves will came up and followed users, and even grew up and spread out like the ivy.

Siddharth Mankad, Aashka Shah and Sunil Vallu – Interactive Wall Installation 2009

Klaus Obermaier & Ars Electronica Futurelab – Apparition

This is an interactive performance combined dance and digital media directed by Klaus Obermaier. The rhythm in this piece reflects on both dancers and the back screen. It sets a connection between dancers’ movement and luminous lines, and can be considered as another dancing performance on the backscreen.

Klaus Obermaier & Ars Electronica Futurelab – Apparition

Tactile Sounds – a virtual exhibition

This exhibition shows how some artists have interpreted and transformed a users experience of sound by using our tactile and visual senses to enhance our experience of the music.

These artist don’t allow music to be listened to placidly, but instead engage the user to interact with sound through tactile interfaces and specific body gestures to create sounds.


Jeff Hoefslinked and Stijn Schiffeleer – Beat Blocks, 2006.

This piece is a tangible sound interface which uses blocks with light blue tape to denote rhythmic phrases. by the placement and number of stripes on the block. Where the user places the block on the board will determine the timbre, or instrument used to play that specific rhythmic phrase.

In the first example shown in the video, the block with two stripes is playing two eight notes within the first note of a 4 note measure (4/4).

This piece eliminates the digital abstraction of beat machines and music programs, and makes the rhythmic notation and instrumental mixing board tactile.

Click here to view the embedded video.

David Bouchard – Sound Mites, 2007

This piece transforms a sound by employing a community of musical boxes which express qualities that give them a sense of personality and artificial intelligence.

These boxes can only create sound when they are used in a group because their pitch changes dynamically based upon their placement within the larger community of boxes.

This logic gives them a social quality which visualizes our own human interactions through sound, LED brightness, and spacial relationships.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Steve Mann and Chris Aimone – FUNtain Hydraulophones, 2007

This piece takes tactile sound experiments out of the gallery and even out of digital technology by placing a musical sculpture into a city setting where anyone can interact with it on a daily basis.

This sculpture allows you to “play water” in the same way one would a flute. The best part is that the sculpture creates sound through innovative mechanical engineering which reawakens the sound capabilities of objects and architectures around us, outside the computer screen.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Martijn van Wagtendonk – Trickle – Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia, 2009

Martijn creates an immersive environment for the spectator to explore and based upon the audiences location in the installation, various kinetic, lighting, audio, and visual elements will be triggered which effect the spectators experience of the sound in the space.

Here, the spacial properties of sound are illuminated by the spectator’s placement within the installation and the architecture and physical installation itself. Although a bit extraordinary, I think this installation  reminds the spectator that the sounds around us are constantly changing, but sometimes, we have to change our physical location in order to discover them.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Acura and Jonathan Jarvis – Interactive Oracle – 2006/2007

This is an example of how touching a table and using body gestures produces, not only music, but also visual representations of their gestures and the sounds produces.

The users also have control of the sounds produced, and the visuals by selecting various categories on the rim of the table.

It also allows more than one person to play music at the same time which makes it a viable instrument.  in performance.

Click here to view the embedded video.

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