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Welcome to Newcastle—-A City of Sanctuary

Full ideas can be found here:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ubmrq2cbee51wo5/AAAXmbX0ICSFk02fNDvpnBjQa?dl=0

Action plan:

1. Apply the Funding from the Arts Council England

2. Liaise Newcastle University’s Robinson Library, Fine Art Department in the School of Arts and Cultures,  School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape, City of Sanctuary (a charity)’s School of Sanctuary Initiative in Newcastle city, and Newcastle’s City Council to implement the scheme.

3. Create a proper visiting plan for refugees, the identity cards, the afterwards interview, the settling, the feedback, the tracking record for their future status after the visit, with excellent event management skills

Defining Home—-Chapter 8: Special Collections 之 20th Century Pamphlet Exhibition

Full contents can be found:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/o9s9wu56zbsmcxn/AAAy8oj9CgvJPjJB1N8G40Vra?dl=0

Initiate the VI System for Newcastle University,

The Brochure Label

If it is needed:



The size of the brochure label can be zoomed depending on how large the actual brochures are; The Special Collections label is to stick on the support of the postcards going to be exhibited. It is 4 (h)*7 (w) cm large; There is a need to consult with UK’s new government after the recent election, about whether such a postal card design is permitted or not  (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2010-to-2015-government-policy-postal-service-reform/2010-to-2015-government-policy-postal-service-reform).

All in all, these should all belong to the Newcastle University’s potential VI system. They follow a Red (RGB: 232, 40, 44) and a Blue (RGB: 0, 74, 130) principle, which should be in accordance with the university’s coat of arms. However, the exact setting of such a red and blue needs to be confirmed by the university’s marketing and outreach department or equivalent.

The Special Collection Case @ Robinson Library, N.C.L.

IMG_20150518_011150

 

In order to let the <20th Century Pamphlets> (the name of one special collection in the library) souvenirs be clearly noticed by the visitors, including the bookmarks, the brochures and the postcards. It would be helpful if each of the three glass boards is moved up until the top one reaches the ceiling of the case. Then Unload the top one and reload it above the ground of the case in a position where it can separate the current layout on the ground floor, and the ones going to be exhibited, namely, the Prototype. Thus the Prototype will be shown on the new second floor counting from the ground.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The current structure makes it easy to adjust due to its flexible assembly on the wall. Simply pull it out and then plug into a proper height following the instructions above.

The Printer Case @ Robinson Library, N.C.L.

IMG_20150518_010935

 

 

What needs to be adjusted is the height of the two glass boards within: In order to let the Prototype exhibition (which will be put on the ground floor within the case), especially the label part (an A4 paper with about 50 degrees’ angle to the ground) be conveniently noticed from above, these two boards need to be moved up at least 10 cm.  Here is the exhibition:




Here is the detail of the label:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1z26w21qwn0mqz8/The%20Label%20Content.pdf?dl=0

Here is the details of the document on the printer:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/53ijx8je4dla2xb/AACF15tGIjpVkC3xQP4Bsdrpa?dl=0

Note: N.C.L. is short for Newcastle University upon Tyne

Creative Enterprise 1: That Year, A Child Was Born,

Youth Insight Letter head-page-001

and then, died……





1644 In-Situ: Homeoffice

Image from: http://www.360doc.com/content/15/0313/18/7775975_454885752.shtml

Above WAS what happened in Far East. Here, <Far East> is used to show a geographically European centred perspective. The reason lies that the server of this blog is currently provided by a European country and its institution.

This may be what happens to Newcastle: http://1644-siegeofnewcastle.8k.com/newcastle.htm

A. D. 1644/04/25——a day to be remembered.

Recommended reading:

http://bbs.tiexue.net/post_6859763_1.html

 

Material Culture 1: (Memory) Recycling

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Following the flat recovered image of the ruler (http://dm.ncl.ac.uk/meteor/2014/12/23/a-technique-review-photoshop-and-a-serendipity-a/), here, the ruler became REAL, by glueing 5 identical pieces together of its blueprint.

The original material chosen by Newcastle University to make the ruler was polyprolene–macromolecular compound which is exactly what we call in the daily life as plastic.

Its recycling processes include:

1. To bury: Hard for degradation and waste land resource;

2. To burn: Poisonous air pollutants are generated;

3. To melt and reform: Environmentally friendly, if, the way to increase the temperature is environmentally friendly itself.

Theme: Memory recycling

If, the essence of recycling is to make the material useful again, then the memory in one’s brain can experience radical recycling process: The part once she thought couldn’t be given enough justifications, might be meaningful through restructuring.

Take the university’s exchange programs for example:

2007-2008, A, Harvard Yenching Fellow,  (to),  Guanghua School of Management, Peking University

2014-2015, C (the author), Peking University, (to), Newcastle University

The meaning lies in that once somebody comes, somebody must leave—as a manifestation of the author’s belief that there exists a energy balance. Imagine each person is a load of energy whose main function is to process the information obtained from the world: Input from the nose, mouth, ears and eyes, while output through his or her own performance (exactly like computers). If someone (or a pack of energy) leaves for a place, there must be someone from another place who comes to supplement the vacant position of that person who leaves. What’s more, there is no rule that this exchange process should happen in the meantime. This means, for example, in 2009 somebody came to place A, but it may be not until 2014 that somebody else left A—This, is a matter of energy gathering and dissipation process, which always varies in speed.

Thus, there must be a B, from Newcastle University to Harvard University, in the zone 2007-2015.

Reference: http://pengshier888.b2bvip.com/news/itemid-113697.shtml

Flusser, V. (1990)  On Memory (Electronic or Otherwise) Leonardo, Vol. 23, No. 4 (1990), pp. 397-399.

Diaries at Archives 2: Citation Problems

After 10 diary series have been completed, a problem comes up: Should they also include reference lists at the end of the contents, as have always been adopted when writing academic essays?

Yes and No

Yes:

1. Definitely part of the ideas come from other resources, thus they should be cited as normal procedures

2. It also helps the writer when someday in the future he/she wants to review what kind of materials have been browsed and digested

3. The blog is a public sphere where others can have access as well. To reference is a way to respect the original authors’ hard work and to facilitate conveniences for other readers

No:

1.  No need. The style is the diary. It’s hard to imagine there’s somebody who even reference when writing diaries

2. Hard to cite. Theoretically anything can appear on reference lists: A poster, a sketch, and even something suddenly flashing in mind—-these things have jumped out of the academic framework.

3. Degree of freedom: when later reading them, places where in-text citations should be can still be easily figured out. Without the bothering of the already existing in-text citations and the reference lists, more editions can be searched out on-line, newer or older, similar to the experience when writing the diaries. Knowledge can be refreshed, as well as the experience.

Take the risks:

Here the author decides to embrace  the “No” and have a look at the potential risks, leaving the formal reference styles to her academic essays or research proposals.

Diary 2

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The five ages described in Hesiod’s ‘Works and Days’ poem sounds similar to what Buddhism calls as six circles of reincarnation, where the heaven and the hell circle stands at the top and the bottom, while others such as the hungry ghosts, the animals, and the human beings stand in the middle. Human beings who seek for the better state should follow the good conduct principle so as to win the chance of entering into heaven. However, the need for solving the problem due to lack of resources, or the intention of regarding it as a problem seems not be that strong as Hesiod might have realized. In fact what I know about Buddhism is to ban, or at least take control of the desire. In such a case, if the Utopian landscape is to be built upon a place where Buddhism is Genius Loci, the aim of it should never be to address the need, but rather to escape from the endless pain, and to seek for the salvation.

 

The meaning of plants may come from the books like Odyssey where asphodel is connected with privilege, the glory of god and afterlife ideal. I’m not sure if asphodel and narcissus means a same kind of plant, however their inherent meanings—the label attached on them seem to be quite different. As is widely known, narcissus is a symbol of extreme self-admiration and surely has nothing to do with utopian imaginary (well it may have, but it largely depends on to what extent the symbolic universe is challenged and reconstructed). Hence would it be quite weird if a plant is selected to a wrong place? I’m thinking about the story of the white and the red poppies—-but this time, things become more serious.

 

In my point of view, it is quite ironic that nowadays, the famous Champs-Élysées avenue has partly become the representation of self-indulgent district, where people enjoy luxury goods and embrace consumerism. This, seems to be in contradiction with what the Elysian Fields originally signifies—-the residence of the virtuous.

 

Not sure if I’ve understood the feature of the imaginaries here. Does that mean the imaginary landscape is just an expectation? This reminds me of a quite common experience nowadays about tourism: People know about a place of interest (In China it quite often appears as a built imaginary landscape based on the utopian literature, like that Peach Blossom Spring), through media, whether it’s newspaper, the TV, the internet, or the brochures. The promotional discourse guides their route towards the destination, and also to some extent distort how they experience that place. The souvenir shopping replaces the instinctive exploration that is without a specific purpose, which is sometimes full of unexpected gains and enjoyments. But why do we still, to some extent, need the expectation? I’ve felt a sense of disappointment, one that arises from the unsatisfactory realities, and one that needs to be cured through following the signage to that built one, though what wait for them might be a new circle of disappointment.

 

Such a landscape is usually far from where travellers daily dwell, so vehicles are needed to carry out their possibly-to-fail hope.